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Having an issue? Checkout our Troubleshooting section to help you get back out on the trail.

  • I’m having inflation problems

    Air leaking at the valve stem of my rim strip

    I am using a Stan’s NoTubes conversion kit/rim strip on my existing wheels:

    There could be an issue with the rim strip. First, check to be sure that you are using the proper rim strip for your rim using our Rim Strip Finder. Not using the correct rim strip can allow air to escape between the rim strip and the bead of the tire into the cavity of the rim and out near the valve stem. Also check to see if the rim strip itself is cut or damaged or if the valve stem is tearing away from the rim strip. Note that in manufacturing the rim strip, the valve is inserted from the back side and the seal is created along the visible oval shape. A separation on the top along the valve base is normal.

    I am using a Stan’s NoTubes rim/wheel:

    All Stan’s NoTubes rims are designed to be run tubeless with just our yellow tape and universal tubeless valves installed. (1 layer on mountain bike rims, 2 layers on road rims) If air seems to be coming out from around the valve stem there could be an issue in that area. The rubber stopper of the valve could be pulling away from the rest of the valve. If this happening, replace the valve stem. Also make sure that the yellow tape is not split or cut beyond the edge of the valve hole. If it is, replace the yellow tape and carefully cut a new hole for the valve stem. Check to see if the tape is cut, punctured, or otherwise damaged around the rest of the wheel as well. Just because the air seems to be coming out around the valve doesn’t mean that it can’t be escaping somewhere else and traveling through the rim cavity. Also be sure that you are using the proper width yellow tape for your rim. Check our rim strip section in the FAQ center to idenify the proper width of tape for your particular rim.

    I’m having trouble installing my rim strip

    Did you check out our Tubeless Kit installation video in the Help Center?

    Rim strip is torn at the valve area

    Rim strips tearing at the valve stem is most commonly caused by over tightening the valve stem nut. The valve stem nut only needs to be hand tight. Do not use any sort of wrench or pliers to tighten the valve stem nut. Though very unlikely due to the bonding process, if your rim strip is found to be torn or damaged out of the box, please call to set up a return and warranty replacement.

    Damaged rim strip

    If you damage the rim strip with a screwdriver, tire lever, or other sharp tool it will void the warranty. Rough handling of pump heads on the valve or over-tightening the valve stem nut can pull the valve out of the rim strip, and is not covered under warranty policy. Stan’s warranty policy covers manufacturing defects in the rim strips, not damage caused by misuse.

    I can’t get my tire inflated

    Check out our MTB Wheel Setup Guide and also our Tubeless Kit installation video in the Help Center. Keep in mind that a compressor may be necessary to inflate some tires. Use soapy water on the tire bead to help the tire slip into the bead seat. Removing the valve core will increase the air flow through the valve for a quicker burst of air to make inflation easier. Also be sure that the tire beads are sitting on either side of the valve hole, not covering the hole. If the tire fits loosely with the rim strip installed it may be necessary to build up the center channel of the rim with a layer of Velox tape.

    My tire is not holding air

    Check for leaks with soap and water. Shake the sealant to areas of the tire where bubbles occur to seal them. If you’re using a Stan’s rim, check to make sure the yellow tape is installed correctly and that it has not been cut, punctured, or otherwise damaged. Thoroughly check that the yellow tape has not split around the valve hole. The yellow tape should not be cut or split beyond the opening of the valve hole in the rim. If you are using one of our conversion rim strips check for proper installation and that it has not been cut, punctured, or otherwise damaged.

  • I’m having tire problems

    I'm having trouble mounting my tire on my rim

    Mounting tires on Stan’s rims is different than most other ‘traditional’ rims. The shape of our rims makes installation technique extremely critical. If done properly, most tires can be mounted without the use of tire levers. If you are using a Stan’s mountain bike rim make sure you are using only one layer of Stan’s yellow tape. Other rim tapes are too thick and won’t allow the tire bead to fall as far into the drop channel of the rim. Begin mounting opposite the valve stem, working your way around to finish at the valve. When you get to rolling the last few inches of the bead on, be sure that the tire bead is pushed down into the drop channel the entire way around the rim. Moving the bead into the center drop channel will give you the most room to work with and make those last couple inches much easier to roll onto the rim.

    I want to run a narrow road tire on your mountain rims

    You may use a tire as small as 30mm on our mountain rims. Max inflation pressure is listed on the rim decals. For tires smaller than those listed on the decal, you may increase the pressure gradually with a max pressure of 55psi for the smallest tires.

    My tire “blew off” the rim

    If your tire has blown off the rim, inspect it thoroughly before attempting to remount as the bead has likely been damaged. Be aware of pressure recommendations on both your tire and rim. Non-tubeless tires cannot ever be inflated above 45psi. Just because the tire is labeled as tubeless-ready or tubeless compatible does not mean there is not a pressure limitation.

    Why is my tire weeping/leaking sealant?

    This is the natural process of the sealant evaporating. It is more evident in some tires, but is nothing to be overly concerned about. This “weeping” does not impact the effectiveness of the sealant. The weeping will dissipate as the sealant seals the casing of the tire. More porous tires may require a sealant refresh shortly after the initial setup.

    I can’t get my tire inflated

    Check out our MTB Wheel Setup Guide and also our Tubeless Kit installation video in the Help Center. Keep in mind that a compressor may be necessary to inflate some tires. Use soapy water on the tire bead to help the tire slip into the bead seat. Removing the valve core will increase the air flow through the valve for a quicker burst of air to make inflation easier. Also be sure that the tire beads are sitting on either side of the valve hole, not covering the hole. If the tire fits loosely with the rim strip installed it may be necessary to build up the center channel of the rim with a layer of Velox tape.

  • I’m having hub problems

    I need to maintaince my hubs and/or replace my hub bearings

    Check out our Hub Service Manuals for our Neo series or our 3.30 series hubs in the Help Center.

    My wheel has side to side play and/or loose bearings

    Check for worn bearings. Stan’s hubs do not have a preload adjustment. When the wheels are installed correctly there should not be any noticeable side to side play while riding. Also check to be sure that the bearings are seated properly and pressed completely into the hub shell.

    My freehub body is binding/not turning

    Start by disassembling your freehub body, here is a video to help. Make sure that the freehub spacer is installed in the wheel, replace the spacer if it is not present or is damaged. If the spacer is present, check your bearings, axle and freehub pawls for wear and/or damage. Replace any worn or damaged parts to assure optimal performance.

    My cassette is stuck on my freehub body, and I can’t get it off

    Stan's freehubs are made lightweight using aluminum like many other brands. If you use a cassette with individual cogs, those cogs can dig into the aluminum splines of the freehub and be difficult to remove. To free the cogs, use a soft-faced mallet to lightly tap the stuck cogs. After removing stuck cassettes, it may be necessary to use a file to remove any burrs on the splines of the freehub body so the cogs can be re-installed. Cassettes with individual steel sprockets may mark the alloy freehub, though marks are only cosmetic and will not affect the performance of the freehub.

    The O-ring broke on the end cap of my 3.30 Series hub

    The o-rings can be fragile, especially with repeated removal. We have replacements available for 15mm end caps. Please contact our customer service line to order. You may also be able to find suitable replacements at your local hardware store. Installation video here.

  • My wheel is making noise

    There’s a rattling noise coming from my rim

    You may have a loose weld sleeve. The weld sleeve is used during the welding process as a heat sink. It is crimped into place with a dimple in the material and is visible at the weld junction. Occasionally, the crimp does not hold and the plate comes loose. It is not a structural element of the rim and does not affect the performance of the rim. The best solution is to remove the rim tape and apply a small amount of non-water based adhesive between the weld plate and the rim. Tubular cement or super glue will do the trick. All rim manufacturers use a weld plate and run into this situation on occasion. Please call Stan’s NoTubes if you need yellow tape to re-apply to the rim or if you do not feel comfortable gluing the weld plate on your own.

    My wheel is creaking

    It’s possible that the spokes could be the source of a creaking noise that seems to be coming from the wheel. Be sure that the wheel does not have any loose spokes and that all the spokes are tensioned to the proper spec. If there is still a creaking noise, put a drop of light lube on each of the spoke crosses. Also add a drop of lube where the J-bend of the spoke sits in the spoke flange of the hub and at each nipple where it sits in the rim. If the noise still persists, check that your QR/Thru axle is properly tightened and add a drop of lube to the cam of the QR lever.

    My wheel is making a grinding noise and/or not spinning smoothly

    Your hub and/or freehub body most likely needs new bearings. Cartridge bearing are a wear item and will eventually wear out over time. Also check that ratchet ring inside the hubshell and the freehub body pawls are properly lubricated with a very light grease. Check out our Hub Service Manuals for our Neo series or our 3.30 series hubs in the Help Center.

  • I’m having wheel/rim problems

    My spokes are loose

    All wheels need re-tensioning early in their life. Spokes/Nipples/Hubs have a 'break-in' period, during which the tension of the wheel may drop. It is a general recommendation to true and tension your wheels to spec. within the first 5 to 10 hours of ride time.

    If spokes loosen repeatedly, there are many factors that can be at play:

    • Spoke nipples un-threading (lack of thread lock or faulty nipple)
    • Spoke tension too high, causing excessive stretch or rim damage
    • Spoke tensions too low, allowing excessive rim deflections and imbalanced stress distribution between spokes

    I'm breaking spokes

    Generally spokes break when they've fatigued, or they've reached their fatigue limit, which happens with age. If your wheels are more than 2 years old, this is likely the case. A wheel can be re-laced with new spokes and nipples if this is the case.  Replacement of the rim should be considered during this step, as most rims of this age have been dented or misaligned, and are also fatigued.

    Spoke tension is a very important factor in all wheel behaviors, including spoke failures. Spoke tension may be too high, over-stressing the spokes. Spoke tension may also be too low, allowing the rim to deflect excessively, which can cause spoke failure upon 'rebound'.  Have a skilled mechanic at an LBS verify the tension and tension balance of your wheels. If tensions are too low, please refer to 'My spokes are loose', above.

    If a rim has been bent, or slightly misaligned, and spoke tension has been applied to true the wheel, particular spokes on the wheel may be over-stressed, which can lead to recurrent spoke failure at those particular locations. Again, have your wheel tension checked by a mechanic with a spoke tensiometer.

    Cracked weld on rim under decal

    A crack at the weld seam is extremely rare. If the rim decals are removed the weld seam will be more visible. When the rim is anodized the weld seam area takes on less anodization, which can look lighter and may be perceived as a crack. I’m Having inflation problems.

    My wheels need to be rebuilt

    Check out our warranty policy for rebuilds.

    There’s a rattling noise coming from my rim

    You may have a loose weld sleeve. The weld sleeve is used during the welding process as a heat sink and is crimped into place with a dimple that is visible at the weld junction. Occasionally, the crimp does not hold and the plate comes loose. It is not a structural element of the rim and does not affect the performance of the rim. The best solution is to remove the yellow rim tape and apply a small amount of non-water based adhesive between the weld plate and the rim. Tubular cement or super glue will do the trick. All rim manufacturers use a weld plate and run into this situation on occasion. Please call Stan’s NoTubes if you need yellow tape to re-apply to the rim or if you do not feel comfortable glueing the weld plate on your own.

    My tape isn’t sticking to the rim.

    Our tape is designed not to leave residue on the rim surface and therefore does not have excessive adhesive. Make sure the rim is very clean before applying. We recommend spraying with isopropyl alcohol and wiping with a clean rag. Pull firmly while applying pressure with your opposite hand to hold the tape in place. Do not attempt to re-use tape once it has been removed from the rim.